Russian Personalities

People well-known in art, sport, film, fashion

Blind Prince Vasily

Blind Prince Vasily

Blind Prince Vasily


If you believe the chroniclers, Vasily II (or Basil II) was under the patronage of higher powers from the early days. According to legend, at the time of his birth, the Moscow priest heard the voice of heaven, which announced to him: “Go and give name to Grand Duke Vasily!” He went to Grand Duchess Sofia and was surprised to learn that she had just given birth to a son. When Vasily headed the state and his uncle Yuri tried to take power from him, a pestilence began in the city of the latter, and stopped only after he abandoned his claims to the throne. Once, during the reign of Vasily, the Lithuanian army attempted to invade Russia, but suddenly a storm began. Frightened Lithuanians immediately concluded peace with the prince. And yet, despite the intervention of higher powers, the fate of Vasily II was very tragic. After all, a third of his life he was blind.
The boy ascended the Muscovite throne at the age of ten. All his childhood and youth Vasily fought with his uncle, Yuri Dmitrievich, who tried to take the throne from his nephew. In 1434, Yuri succeeded. He defeated the army of 19-year-old Vasily and occupied the Russian throne. But Yuri ruled for only about two months and then he suddenly died.
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Russian Strongmen

Russian Strongmen

Russian Strongmen


In Russia, as in no other country, there have always been many athletes, whose achievements caused the amazement of the public. Their portraits were on the pages of sports magazines, on the posters, in shop windows. Athletes and wrestlers shocked the audience with their power tricks, they were legends. They performed in circuses and at fairs, on sports arenas not only in Russia, but also abroad, were the pride of the country. Their heroic games brought people great pleasure. Among the spectators there were those who checked their properties, weights and chains, for weight and strength, always making sure that everything was authentic, without deception. Let’s remember at least some of the famous Russian heroes.
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Alexander Belyaev – great writer

Alexander Belyaev – great writer

Alexander Belyaev – great writer


Alexander Belyaev was born in 1884 into the family of a priest. The little boy was very curious. He made parachutes from sheets and jumped off the roofs of nearby houses, enthusiastically built a glider and in addition took photographs.
There were also mystical incidents. For example, in early youth, Belyaev made his brother’s head in clay. The head was not very similar, and he threw it into the water. And then it turned out that it was at that moment that his brother had drowned. All his life, Belyaev considered himself to be the unwitting culprit of the tragedy. To tell the truth, he almost became an invalid in childhood. Sasha injured the eye seriously, which led to partial vision loss. Parents sent their son to study at the seminary, which he graduated in 1901.
But he refused to become a priest, because instead of the Holy Scripture he loved to read the novels of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. Alexander dreamed of faraway countries, but entered the law department. After the death of his father, he had to support the family. Belyaev gave lessons, drew scenery for the theater, played the violin in a circus orchestra.
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Ivan Bunin and his women

Ivan Bunin and his women

Ivan Bunin and his women


Only in old age, when life is lived, you really begin to appreciate the joys, given by fate, as well as bitterness of loss. (Ivan Bunin)

Ivan Alekseevich Bunin was born at dawn on October 10 (22), 1870 in the small Russian town of Yelets. It was an unusual autumn morning, like an omen, which opened the door to the life full of fame, love, despair and loneliness. Life on the edge: happiness and bitterness, love and hate, loyalty and betrayal, recognition in life and humiliating poverty at the end of the path. His muses were women, who gave him rapture, and troubles, and disappointments, and immeasurable love.
Four women were in the life of the great Russian writer, they left a huge trace in his soul, they tormented his heart, inspired, awakened the talent and desire to create.
Varvara Pashchenko was the first. Bunin wanted to marry her in 1891, at the age of twenty. Varvara worked as a proofreader in the Orlovsky Vestnik. She was older and more experienced, but, being afraid of her father, a well-known doctor in the city, she refused to marry Bunin. Although she promised that she would continue to live with him as a wife. By the way, she secretly met with the rich landowner Arseniy Bibikov, whom she married later.
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Alexander Griboyedov and Nino Chavchavadze

Alexander Griboyedov and Nino Chavchavadze

Alexander Griboyedov and Nino Chavchavadze


Nino Chavchavadze was called “the black rose of Tiflis”. This woman was mourning for 28 years after the death of her husband – Russian poet, diplomat and composer Alexander Griboyedov, the author of the immortal Woe from Wit.
The diplomat, writer and composer Alexander Griboyedov was 17 years older than Nino Chavchavadze. And he knew the girl from her childhood. Little Nino called the Russian diplomat Uncle Sandro. He often visited her father’s house. Alexander Chavchavadze was a Georgian poet and governor of several regions in Georgia. The friendship of two Alexanders was not accidental. Chavchavadze was one of the most educated people of his country and his time. Griboyedov showed himself as a unique personality.
In his youth, the future author of the play Woe from Wit studied at three faculties of the Moscow University. In addition, Griboyedov was an excellent musician: several works written by him, including two great waltzes, reached us.
Extraordinary abilities helped Alexander to become successful in his diplomatic career. In 1819, at the age of 24, Griboyedov liberated the Russian soldiers who were in Persian captivity. Since then he became a diplomat in Persia and quickly learned Persian.
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Alexander Belyavsky – Russian actor

Alexander Belyavsky – Russian actor

Alexander Belyavsky – Russian actor

Alexander Belyavsky was a Soviet and Russian theater and cinema actor, People’s Artist of the Russian Federation (2003), Honored Cultural Worker of Poland. He acted in more than a hundred movies and television series, the most famous of which were Four Tank-men And A Dog, The 13 Chairs Cafe (Kabachok 13 stulev), The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed, and the television series Brigada.
Alexander Borisovich Belyavsky was born on May 6, 1932 in Moscow. The first steps in the acting profession the boy did in the youth theater studio, under the guidance of the actor Leonid Sergeevich Weizler.
The young man graduated from the Geological Prospecting Department of the Moscow Institute of Nonferrous Metals and Gold in 1955. Then Alexander went to the East Siberian Geological Administration in Irkutsk. There Belyavsky first appeared on the stage of an amateur theater. Later, in 1957, he entered the Boris Schukin theater school and graduated from it in 1961.
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Anna Kern – muse of great poet

Anna Kern – muse of great poet

Anna Kern – muse of great poet


Anna Kern was a Russian noblewoman, author of memoirs. In history she is most known for the role she played in the life of great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.
Anna Petrovna Kern was born on February 11 (22), 1800 in Orel. Anna’s parents belonged to wealthy bureaucratic nobility. Her father, Peter Poltoratsky, was a Poltava landowner and court counselor. And her paternal grandfather Mark Fyodorovich Poltoratsky was a Russian singer and state councilor.
The girl read a lot and was very beautiful. Her father found a husband for her, General Ermolai Fedorovich Kern. Anna was 17 years old, Ermolai Fedorovich was 52. Their wedding took place on January 8, 1817. In her diary Anna wrote: “It is impossible to love him. I can’t even respect him. To tell the truth, I almost hate him.” The girl gave birth to three children, but she was rather cold to them. Her daughter Ekaterina (born in 1818) was brought up in the Smolny Institute, daughter Anna (born in 1821) died at the age of 4, and the youngest daughter Olga (1826-1833) lived for only 7 years.
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